Touchdown Venice: High Energy, Low Weather

There was water on the tarmac.

Big puddles of it scattered around so you couldn’t avoid them. Big enough to make a splash, when you walked in them. The splash would then make new puddles.

We hadn’t expected to meet water so soon.

Richardson Oviebo and Aderemi Adegbite, installers for exhibiting artists, discussing whether we packed warm enough. 

Richardson Oviebo and Aderemi Adegbite, installers for exhibiting artists, discussing whether we packed warm enough. 

Actually, we had thought it was only when we boarded a water taxi to our apartment that we would experience anything aquatic.

It was raining.

Benign at first but soon in heavier slants, with more vicious intent.

It was cold as well. Pins and needles cold. Having flown from sweltering Lagos we had expected an at-worst cold Spring. Not chilly. Not wearing-a-sweater-and-yet-no-warmth chilly. Climate change apparently had had other ideas.

We could not be deterred though by rain, cold or wet shoes. We had finally landed in Venice, a journey that had taken two years in the making! Nigeria, at long last would finally be having its own pavilion. We were literally making history by our very presence in Venice to set up the Pavilion for the exhibition.

Soon, we got to our water taxi stop.

Minutes later, we were lost.

Grey Day 

Grey Day 

We had not yet gotten sim cards and there was no Wi-Fi connection to log into.

It was still pouring at this point. Between all of us we had eleven boxes, no Google Maps, no call connection and endless anticipation.

We would later be rescued by our project manager, who we had briefly contacted when we landed at the airport (FREE WI-FI!) and had subsequently calculated our arrival to the T.

We were finally in business, in the real swing of things. Settled. Unpacked. Dinner.

Venice was calling!

TOUCHDOWN!   

TOUCHDOWN! 

 

Ayodeji Rotinwa